Helping a Child or Adolescent Deal with Death

Helpinga Child or Adolescent Deal with Death

Helpinga Child or Adolescent Deal with Death

NationalInstitutes of Health. (2006). Talkingto Children about Death.Retrieved fromhttp://www.cc.nih.gov/ccc/patient_education/pepubs/childeath.pdf

Thewebsite by the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health,addresses the process of discussing issues of death with children.The article argues against the existing misconception that disregardsneed to discuss with children about death. The professional bodystates that children are already aware that death exists, and requireprofessional, informative, and helpful process to make themunderstand its effect and impact. The website emphasizes on theappropriate procedures to follow in case children ask hard questionsabout death. The website is very helpful and detailed on ways ofaddressing death issues with children.

Webb,B. N. (2011).&nbspHelpingbereaved children: A handbook for practitioners.New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Thebook contains different topics on children and death. It combinesresearch and professional advice and data from different researcherson assessment processes for bereaved children, different effects ofdeath depending on family member, type of death, and preparedness ofthe child. The book targets practitioners mandated with the task ofprotecting and counseling affected children. The professionalanalyses are very helpful, factual, and objectively presented to helpchildren cope with death, loss, or any other form of psychologicaldisorientation.

Cohen,J. A., &amp Mannarino, A. P. (2011). Supporting children withtraumatic grief: What educators need to know.&nbspSchoolPsychology International,&nbsp32(2),117-131.

Thesystematic research addresses the need for preparedness against childtraumatic grief (CTG). The researchers indicate the possibilities ofCTG among bereaved children and developed evidence-based strategiesfor adoption by educators. The article offers detailed plan on how toapproach children, recognize reminders, support, and sustain childrenhealth and wellbeing using professional tools and techniques. Thearticle is helpful in generating an evidence-based review ofstrategies to follow when handling a bereaved child or adolescent.

NationalAssociation of School Psychologists. (2003). HelpingChildren Cope With Loss, Death, and Grief Tips for Teachers andParents.Retrieved fromhttp://www.nasponline.org/resources/crisis_safety/griefwar.pdf

Thewebsite by the national association of school psychologists focus onthe process of expressing grief, handling emotional breakdown, shock,and other emotional stress after losing a family member. The webarticle addresses teachers and parents on the best ways to handlegrief by presenting a breakdown of developmental phases and theirinfluence in understanding death. The article is very important sinceit offers descriptive reactions at every development stage, hencepreparing professionals deal with affected children and adolescents.

References

Cohen,J. A., &amp Mannarino, A. P. (2011). Supporting children withtraumatic grief: What educators need to know.&nbspSchoolPsychology International,&nbsp32(2),117-131.

NationalAssociation of School Psychologists. (2003). HelpingChildren Cope With Loss, Death, and Grief Tips for Teachers andParents.Retrieved fromhttp://www.nasponline.org/resources/crisis_safety/griefwar.pdf

NationalInstitutes of Health. (2006). Talkingto Children about Death.Retrieved fromhttp://www.cc.nih.gov/ccc/patient_education/pepubs/childeath.pdf

Webb,B. N. (2011).&nbspHelpingbereaved children: A handbook for practitioners.New York, NY: Guilford Press.